Bachelor's Degrees

Food Science – Technology Emphasis

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Overview

The B.S. in Food Science with a Technology emphasis has courses in business and agricultural commodities, along with technical training.

The B.S. in Food Science with a Technology emphasis is for students  interested in business opportunities for technically trained individuals. It offers greater flexibility by complementing Food Science coursework with business, agricultural commodity, and computer science courses.

For more information contact our undergraduate academic adviser, Ms. April Morrison  or the Food Science undergraduate coordinator, Dr. Keith Harris.

Curriculum

Food Science (BS): Technology (11FOODSBS-11FOODSTFS)

FRESHMAN YEAR
Fall Semester Credit Spring Semester Credit
ALS 103 Transitions & Diversity
BIO 183 Intro Bio: Cellular & Molecular
ENG 101 Acad Writing & Research
MA 107 Precalculus I
GEP Social Science
HES_*** Health & Exercise Studies
1
4
4
3
3
1 
CH 101 Chemistry I
CH 102 General Chemistry Lab
FS 201 Intro to Food Science
MA 114 Intro. to Finite Math or
MA 131 Analytic Geom & Calc A
GEP Humanities
HES_*** Health & Exercise Studies
3
1
3
33
1
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Fall Semester Credit Spring Semester Credit
CH 220 Intro Organic Chemistry or
CH 221 Organic Chemistry I and
CH 222 Organic Chem I Lab
FS 290 Careers Food and Bioproces Sci
MA 121 Elements of Calculus or
MA 231 Analytic Geom & Calculus B
MA 132 Computational Math
PY 211 College Physics
GEP Interdisciplinary Persp
4
3
1
1
31
4
2-3
CH 201 Chemistry II
CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab
FS 231 Princ. of Food & Biopro. Engin
BUS/EC/Minor Elective
COM 110 Public Speaking or
COM 112 Interpersonal Comm
3
1
4
3
3
JUNIOR YEAR
Fall Semester Credit Spring Semester Credit
FS 402 Chem Food & Bioprocess Materials
GEP Interdisciplinary Persp
Food Science Elective
BUS/EC/Minor Elective
MB 351 General Microbiology
MB 352 General Microbiology Lab
4
3
3
3
3
1 
FS 403 Analyt Tech Food & Bioproc Sci
FS 405 Food Microbiology
FS 406 Food Microbiology Laboratory
GEP Additional Breadth
BUS/EC/Minor Elective
4
3
1
3
3
SENIOR YEAR
Fall Semester Credit Spring Semester Credit
ST 311 Introduction to Statistics
FS 421 Food Preservation
GEP Humanities
Free/Minor Elective
Free/Minor Elective
3
3
3
3
3
FS 475 Prob & Design in Food & Bioproces
FS 416 Quality Control in Food & Bioproces
Food Science Elective
Free/Minor Elective
GEP Social Science
3
3
3
3
3
Minimum Credit Hours Required for Graduation 120

Food Science Course Descriptions

(See course catalog for prerequisites, credit hours, and semesters offered)

FS 201 Introduction to Food Science

Science and practice of providing a wholesome, nutritious, economical and readily available supply of basic and processed foodstuffs. Chemical nature of foods, nutritional requirements, health-related dietary considerations, microorganisms, foodborne illnesses, preservation and processing, food additives, food labeling, food safety and the consumer.

FS 231 Principles of Food and Bioprocess Engineering

Engineering concepts and their applications to the food and bioprocessing industries. Mass and energy balances and principles related to fluid flow, heat transfer, refrigeration and freezing, psychrometrics, and selected unit operations found in these industries.

FS 290 Careers in Food and Bioprocessing Sciences

Careers and opportunities related to food and bioprocessing industries and regulatory agencies. Development of professional enhancement skills. Resume preparation, interviewing techniques, leadership development, oral and written communication, and team building. Benefits of undergraduate research, internships, and graduate education.

FS 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs

Processing and preserving fresh poultry, red meats, seafood, and eggs. Ante- and post-mortem events as they affect quality, yield, and compositional characteristics of muscle foods. Principles and procedures involved in the production of processed meat items.

FS 324 Milk and Dairy Products

Introduction to the manufacture of dairy products. Dairy processing procedures from the farm, through the dairy plant, and to the consumer are studied. The course consists of 15 learning modules, three exams, and a project.

FS 330 Science of Food Preparation

Basic elements of culinary practices are taught in conjunction with the scientific basis for how flavor, texture, and appearance of foods are created or maintained during food preparation.

FS 350 Introduction to HACCP

Introductory course on the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points System (HACCP) which is designed to decrease hazards in foods. An International HACCP Alliance approved curriculum which covers prerequisite programs. A step by step approach for developing and implementing a HACCP plan for USDA regulated food processing plants. Offered only as a world wide web course through the Office of Instructional Telecommunications.

FS 351 Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures in Food Safety Control

This course is one of a series of six courses that are part of North Carolina State University’s Food Safety Certification program. “Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOP’s) in Food Safety Control” addresses current federal regulatory requirements for seafood, meat, and poultry processing operations. The course also addresses the international dimensions of sanitary standards in import/export of food. The course is designed to provide the student with the background necessary to develop, implement and maintain a sanitation plan based on sanitation standard operating procedures (SSOP’s).

FS 352 Introduction to Microbiological Food Safety Hazards

The course is designed to provide an introduction to the more prominent microbial foodborne safety hazards and their control. Lessons are provided on specific pathogens, their pathogenesis and transmission and the scientific basis for specific control options. In addition, the course provides up-to-date information on current “hot-topics” in food microbiology, including food safety regulations and emerging food safety issues.Course is offered to non-science majors. Students may not receive credit for both FS 352 and FS 405.

FS 353 Good Manufacturing Practices

Food Safety sanitation in the United States is primarily regulated by FDA under their “Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP).” This course will introduce the student to the GMP and consider how and why they were developed. Students will become familiar with the issues of compliance and consider the regulations in light of international laws and current practices. The student should have some familiarity with food processing and safety.

FS 354 Food Sanitation

Discussion of hygienic practices, requirements for sanitation programs, and modern sanitation practices in food processing facilities. At the end of this course, students will have the knowledge to develop and maintain a sanitation program.

FS 402 Chemistry of Food and Bioprocessed Materials

The course focuses on the properties of biological molecules (e.g., proteins, enzymes lipids, carbohydrates and pigments) found in foods and pharmaceuticals. Basic elements of molecules, such as structure and reactive groups, are presented in regard to how they affect the properties of foods and pharmaceuticals. Reactions such as Maillard browning and lipid oxidation are discussed regarding mechanisms, products and controlling processes. Laboratory experiments emphasize basic concepts discussed in lecture and provide a practical working knowledge of select analytical equipment.

FS 403 Analytical Techniques in Food & Bioprocessing Science

Principles, methods and techniques for quantitative physical and chemical analyses of food, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical products. Results of analyses evaluated in terms of quality standards and governing regulations.

FS (MB) 405 Food Microbiology

Microorganisms of importance in foods and their metabolic activities. Source of microbial contamination during food production, processing and storage. Microbial spoilage; foods as vectors of human pathogens. Physical and chemical destruction of microorganisms in foods and the kinetics involved. Conversions of raw foods by microorganisms into food products. Microbiological standards for regulatory and trade purposes.

FS (MB) 406 Food Microbiology Lab

Laboratory experience to complement FS/MB 405. Skills in detecting and quantitating microorganisms and their toxins in foods. Application of colony and direct microscopic counts, most probable numbers, enzyme immunoassays, nucleic acid probes and computer modeling are used to understand the numbers and types of microorganisms or microbial end products in foods. Laboratory safety and oral and written reports are emphasized.

FS 407 Risk Analysis and Hazard Analysis in Food Safety

In-depth focus on the application of the first HACCP principle, Hazard Analysis, on the identification of food safety hazards, as well as the emerging importance of risk assessment. Distance Education Only.

FS 416 Quality Control in Food and Bioprocessing

Organization and principles of quality control in the food and bioprocessing industries. Regulations and process control to maintain safety and quality. Evaluation of physical, microbiological, chemical, sensory, and stability testing for food and bioprocessed materials. Risk assessment, hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP), process control, water quality, waste water analysis and reduction. Cleaning and sanitation and compliance inspection.

FS 421 Food Preservation 

Food preservation methods. Emphasis on thermal, freezing, drying and fermentation processes and corresponding physical, chemical and organoleptic changes to products. Application of preservation schemes to the development of an overall processing operation.

FS (BBS) (BEC) 426 Upstream Biomanufacturing Laboratory 

This course is an introduction to current food manufacturing practice (CGMP) as applied to the growth of microbial cells in bioreactors. Hands-on experience is obtained in the operation and control of 30 liter bioreactors to study agitation, oxygen transfer, cleaning, sterilization, media preparation and the growth of recombinant E. coli for protein production.

FS 453 Food Laws and Regulations 

Federal and state laws and regulations, and case law history affecting food production, processing, packaging, marketing, and distribution of food and food products. History of food law, enactment of laws and regulations, legal research, and regulatory agencies.

FS (HS) 462 Postharvest Physiology 

Preharvest and postharvest factors that affect market quality of horticultural commodities with an emphasis on technologies to preserve postharvest quality and extend storage life of fruits, vegetables and ornamentals.

FS 475 Problems and Design in Food and Bioprocessing Science 

Team approach to problem solving and product/process design and development. Ingredient functionality; formulation, safety, processing, packaging, sensory evaluation, regulatory issues, hazard analysis, critical control points (HACCP), nutritional labeling and other pertinent scientific, technical, marketing and financial aspects. Oral and written presentations are required.

Career Prospects

As a food scientist you might conduct research to improve food flavor, color, texture, nutritional value, safety, or cost. Food scientists work in a variety of areas, both public and private, including universities, government, food, beverage and pharmaceutical companies.

Examples of job titles and salary ranges are:

  • Food Scientist $40,000-$90,000
  • Food Technologist $42,000-$78,000
  • Sensory Specialist $41,000-$60,000
  • Quality Assurance Specialist $36,000-$73,000
  • Consumer Safety Office $32,000-$67,000

Financial Aid & Scholarships

A wide variety of financial support is available from the department, college and university.

Learn More

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Testimonials

“The FBNS Department helped accelerate my education and career goals because we have a strong set of well-known faculty in the relatively small food science professional network. Attending food science conferences and mentioning how I am a student at NC State allows me to stand out among other students because our department is so involved and well-respected. Unparalleled student involvement in the food science and nutrition clubs also helped me create a large network of peers who motivate and encourage me to try my hardest.” – Elliott McDowell, ’15

“Majoring in Food Science has been extremely rewarding and has professionally and academically inspired me. The entire department has been wonderful—every professor I have interacted with has been extraordinarily receptive. They give me their resources, time, and consideration in order to make me a better student, researcher, and individual.” – Sean Holland Whitfield, ’16

“Becoming a part of the FBNS department at NC State has been the best decision of my college experience. Taking Dr. Harris’ FS 201 class showed me the amazing scope and scale of food science, something I was totally unfamiliar with. Basic food science concepts introduced in FS 201 have been reinforced through my experience with different professors. The personal connections between faculty and students, as well as the myriad opportunities for hands on experience set the FBNS department apart from all other departments on campus.” – Currey Nobles, ’15

“During my time at NC State I have gained not only useful analytical and laboratory skills from my courses, research, and internship experiences, but also team, service, and leadership skills from group projects and the Food Science Club. Courses such as Food Chemistry with Dr. Foegeding and Food Analysis with Dr. Harris kindled excitement and curiosity for food and the sciences that can describe and predict its behavior. Curiosity and skills are the drive and tools that will help me and other food scientists solve major problems the world is currently facing, including how to feed the growing global population, how to combat obesity in the developed world, and how to improve food safety and nutrition in the developing world.” – James Chapa, ’15