Evelyn Durmaz Evelyn Durmaz

Department of Food Science
300 Schaub Hall, Box 7624
Raleigh, NC 27695-7624
Phone: 919 515-3552
Fax: 919 515-7124
edfs@unity.ncsu.edu

M.S. Food Science/Biotechnology, North Carolina State University 1981
B.S. Food Science, North Carolina State University 1992

Research Assistant 1998 - Present
Research Technician III 1993- 1998


 
The focus of my research at North Carolina State University has been on phage resistance mechanisms and the phage evolutionary routes for circumventing those mechanisms. My M.S. project concerned the identification and molecular characterization of an abortive phage defense mechanism, abiC. The abiC gene was cloned from a mobile plasmid encoding both abortive and restriction/modification defenses. AbiC functions during the middle to late stages of phage propagation to abort the release of virulent phages. Subsequent work combined variations of three abortive and three restriction/modification defenses in a lactococcal strain as a demonstration of how a single strain encoding different defenses can be used in rotation to maintain a high level of phage resistance. Another project characterized mutant recombinant phages which had evolved to overcome AbiA and Per31, two other abortive resistance mechanisms. The recombinant phages had acquired regions of DNA from the lactococcal host genome to replace the phage origin of replication, thus becoming resistant to the abortive defenses, which target phage DNA replication. A recent project concerns the characterization of a CI repressor of a lytic lactococcal phage. A truncated form of CI was developed which significantly retards infection by a number of related lytic phages. Current work concerns the enhancement of AbiA. Inclusion of downstream genes with the subcloned AbiA resistance mechanism significantly increases the effect of this abortive defense mechanism.

Publications
Durmaz, E., S. A. Madsen, H. Israelsen, and T. R. Klaenhammer. 2002. Lactococcus lactis lytic bacteriophages of the p335 group are inhibited by overexpression of a truncated CI repressor. J. Bacteriol. 184:6532-6543.

Durmaz, E., and T. R. Klaenhammer. 2000. Genetic analysis of chromosomal regions of Lactococcus lactis acquired by recombinant lytic phages. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 66:895-903.

Durmaz, E., and T. R. Klaenhammer. 1995. A Starter Culture Rotation Strategy Incorporating Paired Restriction/Modification and Abortive Infection Bacteriophage Defenses in a Single Lactococcus-Lactis Strain. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 61:1266-1273.

Moineau, S., E. Durmaz, S. Pandian, and T. R. Klaenhammer. 1993. Differentiation of 2 Abortive Mechanisms By Using Monoclonal- Antibodies Directed Toward Lactococcal Bacteriophage Capsid Proteins. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 59:208-212

Durmaz, E., D. L. Higgins, and T. R. Klaenhammer. 1992. Molecular Characterization of a 2nd Abortive Phage Resistance Gene Present in Lactococcus-Lactis Subsp Lactis ME2. Journal of Bacteriology. 174:7463-7469.

Published Abstracts
Durmaz, E., Madsen, S.M., Israelsen, H., and T. R. Klaenhammer. Functional analysis of an inactive CI repressor of lactococcal phage 31 and a truncated derivative that exhibits self-repression and inhibition of superinfecting phage. Poster presented at the American Society of Microbiology conference on Streptococcal Genetics, April 2002.

Durmaz, E. and T. R. Klaenhammer. Enhancement of AbiA phage resistance by expression of downstream open reading frames on pTR2030. Poster presented at the Seventh Lactic Acid Bacteria Symposium in the Netherlands in September 2002.

Durmaz, E., Madsen, S.M., Israelsen, H. and T.R. Klaenhammer. Bacteriophages of the P335 species, virulent for Lactococcus lactis, are inhibited by overexpression of a truncated CI repressor. 101st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, Orlando, Florida, May 20-24, 2001.

Durmaz, E. and T. R. Klaenhammer. Sequence homologies between a lytic recombinant phage and temperate phages identify an evolutionary step for the emergence of virulent lytic phages in Lactococcus lactis. 6th Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria, Veldhoven, the Netherlands, September 19-23, 1999.

Durmaz, E. and T. R. Klaenhammer. Lactococcus lactis NCK203 DNA homologous to temperate lactococcal phages r1t and BK5-T contributes to the evolution of recombinant variants of lytic phage 31. 92th Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, University of Guelph, Canada, June 22-25, 1997.

Durmaz, E. and T. R. Klaenhammer. Characterization and sequencing of recombinant Lactococcal phage 31.1. 5th Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria, Veldhoven, the Netherlands, September 8-12, 1996.

Durmaz, E., O'Sullivan, D.J., and T. R. Klaenhammer. Site-specific chromosomal disruptions of Lactotoccus lactis NCK203 prevent the appearance of new recombinant lytic phage 31.1. 90th Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY., June 25-28, 1995.

Klaenhammer, T.R., O'Sullivan, D., Moineau, S., Dinsmore, P, and E. Durmaz. Genetic strategies to construct phage insensitive lactococci for dairy fermentations. 7th International Symposium on the Genetics of Industrial Microorganisms, Montreal, Canada, June 26-July 1, 1994.

Durmaz, E. and T.R. Klaenhammer. A starter culture rotation strategy incorporating paired restriction/modification and abortive bacteriophage defenses in a single Lactococcus lactis strain. 7th International Symposium on the Genetics of Industrial Microorganisms, Montreal, Canada, June 26-July 1, 1994.

Durmaz, E. and T. R. Klaenhammer. A fourth mechanism for bacteriophage resistance in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ME2. 86th Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, August 12-15, 1991.

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